" There is a 'can' in cancer, because we 'can' beat it ! "

Cancer :


Whether you have cancer or are close to someone who does, understanding what to expect can help you cope. In this section you can find basic information about cancer and what causes it, as well as in- depth information about specific types of cancer, their risk factors, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment options.


1. What is cancer ?


Cancer can start any place in the body. It starts when cells grow out of control and crowd out normal cells. This makes it hard for the body to work the way it should.

Cancer can be treated very well for many people. In fact, more people than ever before lead full lives after cancer treatment. Cancer is not just one disease.

There are many types of cancer. It’s not just one disease. Cancer can start in the Lungs, the Breast, the Colon, or even in the blood. Cancers are alike in some ways, but they are different in the ways they grow and spread.

2. What are the signs of cancer ?


The Nine Warning Signs

  • 1. Change in Bowel or Bladder habits

  • 2. A sore that does not heal

  • 3. Unusual bleeding or discharge

  • 4. Thickening of a lump in breast or elsewhere

  • 5. Indigestion or difficulty in swallowing

  • 6. Obvious change in a wart or mole

  • 7. Nagging cough or hoarseness

  • 8. Unexplained anemia, fever, fatigue

  • 9. Sudden, unexplained weight loss

3. How cancer occurs?


The cells in our bodies all have certain jobs to do. Normal cells divide in an orderly way. They die when they are worn out or damaged, and new cells take their place. Cancer is when the cells start to grow out of control. The cancer cells keep on growing and making new cells. They crowd out normal cells. This causes problems in the part of the body where the cancer started

4. How are cancers different?

Some cancers grow and spread fast. Others grow more slowly. They also respond to treatment in different ways. Some types of cancer are best treated with surgery; others respond better to drugs called chemotherapy (key-mo-THER-uh-pee). Often 2 or more treatments are used to get the best results.

When someone has cancer, the doctor will want to find out what kind of cancer it is. People with cancer need treatment that works for their type of cancer.


[A] Common treatments for cancer

1. Surgery

Surgery has been used to treat cancer for many, many years. Surgery also plays a key role in diagnosing cancer and finding out how far it may have spread.

2. Chemo therapy

Chemotherapy (chemo) usually refers to the use of medicines or drugs to treat cancer. The thought of having chemotherapy frightens many people. But knowing what chemotherapy is, how it works, and what to expect can often help calm your fears. It can also give you a better sense of control over your cancer treatment.


3. Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy uses high-energy particles or waves to destroy or damage cancer cells. It is one of the most common treatments for cancer, either by itself or along with other forms of treatment.


4. Targeted Cancer Therapy

Targeted therapy is a newer type of cancer treatment that uses drugs or other substances to more precisely identify and attack cancer cells, usually while doing little damage to normal cells. Targeted therapy is a growing part of many cancer treatment regimens.


5. Cancer Immunotherapy

Targeted therapy is a newer type of cancer treatment that uses drugs or other substances to more precisely identify and attack cancer cells, usually while doing little damage to normal cells. Targeted therapy is a growing part of many cancer treatment regimens.


6. Stem Cell Transplant For Cancer

Stem cell transplants, including peripheral blood, bone marrow, and cord blood transplants, can be used to treat cancer. Stem cell transplants are most often used for cancers affecting the blood or immune system, such as leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma.

We’ll outline why people need transplants, what stem cells do, and what a transplant is like for most people. We’ll also cover some of the issues that come with transplants, and what it’s like to donate stem cells.